Tropical Puerto Rico elopement on the beach

How To Plan a DIY Elopement Ceremony

Eloping is a popular option for couples who want to keep their wedding ceremony intimate and personal. And while you can certainly hire an officiant to perform your ceremony, there are many benefits to creating your own “just us” elopement ceremony. Doing so allows you to customize every aspect of the ceremony to reflect your unique relationship.

Plus, it can be a fun and rewarding experience to create your own ceremony together. And of course, a DIY elopement ceremony is going to be a more intimate, personal experience than hiring an officiant. It’s sure to be a memorable experience that you’ll cherish for years to come.

So if you’re thinking about eloping, keep reading for some tips on creating a DIY “just us” ceremony.

You’ve decided to elope! Whether you’re looking to save money, avoid wedding planning stress, or simply want a more intimate ceremony, there are plenty of reasons to choose this route. And while it may seem like a simple process, there are actually a few steps you’ll need to take to make sure your elopement is legal. Here are some options for tying the knot without an officiant:

  1. Get married in a civil ceremony at your local courthouse. This is probably the simplest option, and you can usually arrange everything with little advance notice. Plus, most courthouses offer free or low-cost ceremonies. Then you can have your Spiritual Ceremony whenever and wherever you want!
  2. Have a friend or family member officiate your ceremony. While they’ll need to do a bit of legwork to make sure they are legally able to officiate in your state, this can be a great way to personalize your elopement. Just be sure to have them write out your ceremony in advance and practice it a few times!
  3. Self-solemnize your marriage. This means that you serve as your own officiant, and while it’s not legally recognized in all states, it is an option in some. Google says Colorado, California, District of Columbia, Illinois, Kansas, Maine, Nevada, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin all allow self-solemnizing marriages. If you go this route, just be sure to check local marriage laws to be sure and find out the necessary steps.
  4. Do the paperwork ahead of time. When Scott and I were married, we had a wedding officiant meet us at a Starbucks to fill out and sign our marriage license. Then two random people having coffee signed as our witnesses. It was fun and we love having that experience as “our little secret”. Fun fact- we did that on April Fool’s Day!
  5. I am a licensed, ordained minister with Universal Life Church, and can legally marry couples in most states. I’m always happy to help couples with their wedding documents! I can’t perform your whole wedding ceremony, because then you wouldn’t have any photos of it, but I can help you design a DIY “just us” ceremony then pronounce you married and do the legal paperwork.

So you can see there are lots of options for doing a DIY elopement ceremony. If you decide to do the legal part ahead on a different day than your ceremony, note that your legal wedding date will be different than your ceremony date. For Scott and I, this didn’t matter. We still celebrate our wedding anniversary on the day of our wedding ceremony, and every April Fool’s we have a secret celebration. ;)

benefits to a “just us” elopement ceremony

On your wedding day, the last thing you want is to feel like you’re going through the motions. If you want your ceremony to be a truly personal and intimate affair, that’s perfectly understandable. After all, this is one of the most important days of your life! There are lots of ways to make your ceremony unique, from writing your own vows to incorporating special readings or traditions.

And there’s no need to worry about saying your vows in front of an audience or offending anyone. So go ahead and make your ceremony exactly what you’ve always dreamed of. It’s your day, after all!

craft your DIY elopement ceremony

If you’re planning a DIY elopement ceremony, you can use the following prompts to help you craft it. While a traditional wedding ceremony includes saying vows, exchanging rings, and being pronounced as a married couple, you can go bananas and create your own DIY elopement ceremony that is special and unique to you as a couple!

This is your chance to personalize your ceremony and express your love and commitment for one another. Here are some ideas for creating your own elopement ceremony. I recommend writing everything down that you plan, and then you can preserve it in a folder or binder as a wedding keepsake!

01: create your elopement ceremony script

Writing your own DIY elopement ceremony can be a little overwhelming, but it’s also important if you want your ceremony to be beautiful and memorable instead of awkward. Plus, it’s a great way to personalize your big day. Here are a few tips to help you get started:

  1. Start by brainstorming all the elements you want to include in your ceremony. Do you want to write your own vows? Include a reading? Have music playing during the ceremony? Once you have a good understanding of what you want, you can start putting together your ceremony script.
  2. Keep it simple. Your ceremony should be reflective of your relationship and your unique love story. There’s no need to complicate things with too many bells and whistles.
  3. Be sure to include some personal touches. This is your opportunity to really make the ceremony your own. Incorporate elements that are significant to you and your partner, such as readings, unity ceremonies, or traditions.
  4. Practice, practice, practice! Once you have a draft of your ceremony script, it’s important to practice delivering it aloud. This will help ensure that the final product is polished and ready for your big day. You can each practice in front of a mirror, or ask a friend to listen.

02: getting the ceremony space ready

When two people decide to elope, it is a deeply personal decision. There is no wrong way to do it.

Depending on the location of the elopement, there may be a specific spot that has personal significance. For example, couples who elope in the woods may want to exchange their vows beneath a favorite tree. Or, those who are eloping at the beach may choose to stand at the water’s edge, where the waves crash against the shore. No matter where the ceremony takes place, you can create a space that is uniquely yours.

You can find your ceremony spot ahead of time by visiting the location and choosing your spot. If you do this I recommend visiting at around the same time of year and same time of day as your ceremony, so you can see what the conditions and lighting are like.

Or, if you like adventure and spontaneity, you can just choose a general location for your elopement ceremony and then look for the perfect spot on the day of.

If you are a spiritual couple, you might consider consecrating the space for your ceremony or doing an energy cleanse before you get in place and start.

Many couples choose to create a special space to exchange their vows. This space can be as simple as a blanket or rug placed on the ground, or as elaborate as an altar adorned with candles and flowers. The important thing is that it is a space that feels sacred and special to you.

03: starting the ceremony

Once the two of you are in your elopement ceremony spot, what comes next? How does the ceremony start?

I recommend starting your ceremony by facing each other and holding each other’s hands, If you have a bouquet, you can set it on the ground next to you. then you can take a deep breath together and just center yourselves before you begin.

You can appoint one of you to start the ceremony with an opening script, or you can go right into your vows if you want. If you want to start with an opening, here are some ideas:

  • We have arrived here today to perform the rite of marriage between us. And may it be the first of many times we affirm our love, commitment, and devotion to one another.
  • As we stand here with the sky, trees, and wild as our witnesses, we celebrate our sacred union in marriage as well as the harmony of our minds, bodies, and spirits.
  • We stand here today, in this beautiful location, to commit ourselves and unite in marriage.

04: reading your vows

The next part of the wedding ceremony is reading your vows to one another. These are the words that you will commit yourself to your partner, pledging your loyalty through good times and bad, in sickness and in health. Wedding vows are some of the most important words you will ever speak, so take a moment to really think about what you want to say.

Remember, these are the promises that you will be making for the rest of your life, so make them count. Think about all the things you love about your partner and all the reasons why you want to spend the rest of your life with them. Express your love and commitment in your own words, from the bottom of your heart. Let your partner know that they are everything you have ever wanted and more. These are the words that will stay with you forever, so make them special.

I recommend writing down your vows in personal vow books like these. Not only do they look better in photos than a folded-up piece of paper, but they can also be a treasured wedding keepsake!

05: add something personal (optional)

This is an opportunity to add personal touches that will make your wedding ceremony even more memorable. For example, you may wish to include a family tradition or heirloom in the ceremony. You could add a new tradition, such as planting a tree together during the ceremony. This would be a symbolic way of representing your commitment to each other and your new life together. Regardless of what you choose to do, adding personal elements to your wedding ceremony will make it even more special and meaningful.

Here are some of my favorite ways to personalize an elopement ceremony:

  • Plant a tree together. You can plant it at your ceremony spot, but make sure you choose a species of tree that is native to the location and make sure it will be watered and cared for as it grows. Alternatively, you can plant a tree in a pot and then transfer it to the ground in a special place where you can visit it often and care for it. You can even bring a little soil from each person’s home or family home to signify unity and common ground.
  • Do a handfasting or tie a knot.
  • Make an elements jar together. Fill a jar full of natural elements you find together at your ceremony spot. This could be sand, soil, sticks, leaves, stones, etc. Keep it in your home as a wedding day keepsake to remind you of your vows.
  • Read letters from family and friends. You can ask loved ones to write you a letter with well-wishes and/or advice for you to read on your wedding day. This is a great way to include them and let them know how important they are to you!
  • READ MORE ideas to help you personalize your elopement ceremony.

Use your imagination, get creative, and think about what would be significant to YOU as a couple!

06: exchange rings

Here’s the part where you exchange rings. Decide ahead of time who will go first, and that person will place the other’s ring first. When you place the ring, it’s a good idea to say something official. Some ideas for this:

  • I give you this ring to signify my love and commitment to you.
  • I give you this ring as a visible and constant symbol of my promise to be with you as long as I live.
  • I give you this ring in God’s name (or in the name of everlasting love), as a symbol of all that we have promised and all that we shall share.
  • This ring is symbolic of my never-ending commitment, love, and devotion to you.
  • This ring is a symbol of my eternal love. May our everlasting friendship reign forevermore.

07: the pronouncement

If you have anyone there with you at your ceremony (such as your photographer!) you can ask them to do this part for you, or you can do it yourselves. Either way will be perfect. If you decide to say it yourselves, choose who will say it ahead of time and the pronouncement can go like:

  • Since we have grown in knowledge and love of one another, and because we have both agreed in our desire to go forward in life together, seeking an even richer, deepening relationship, and because we have pledged to meet sorrow and joy as one family, we rejoice to recognize each other as (preferred titles). (Optional kiss)
  • We have both pledged ourselves to one another, declared our love for one another, and agree to go forth in life together no matter the circumstances.  From this moment forward we are (preferred titles). (Optional kiss)
  • From today on family, friends, community, and indeed the whole world will know us as co-travelers through life, adventurers, soul-mates, (preferred titles). (Optional kiss)
  •  It is with our vows in mind that declare we are now (preferred titles). (Optional kiss)

what to do right after your elopement ceremony

Right after your elopement ceremony ends, you’ll likely be feeling the high! You might want to consider doing a little gesture of celebration before you transition to the next part of your elopement day. Perhaps you’ll want to share a piece of cake, do a shot together, or do a toast with some bubbly. Or maybe you’ll want to do a first dance!

Whatever you do, take a moment to savor this special time. You’ve just taken a big step, and you deserve to celebrate! After all, this is your elopement day, and you can do whatever you want! So go ahead and let loose – you’re on your way to married bliss!

As an elopement photographer, I have to recommend doing some beautiful photos with just the two of you on your wedding day! Most couples choose to do these after their ceremony, but you can always do them before if you decide to get ready together or do a first look.

I hope this guide helps you create a beautiful and meaningful ceremony just for the two of you. Remember this is your day and you deserve an unforgettable wedding ceremony!

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